How I Manage Competition in High School



Hey everyone, I am BACK!


Today, I want to talk about something very meaningful to me: competition.


With college decisions coming out, it can be a struggle for underclassmen to keep their focus while seeing many get into schools of their dreams. If you are someone striving for the Ivy League or any top school, it is so important to be able to effectively manage competition.


It is definitely hard in high school to have to see where you stack up amongst the student body in various aspects that you feel you are good at. Whether that be academic or sports-related, it can be a struggle to keep your eyes on your own paper.


Personally, I still struggle greatly with the idea that people may be doing more than me or better than me in a certain aspects. It makes me want to constantly do more and take on way too much for my own good. If you are like this, I have some key advice that has helped me shift how I look at competition in academics and in my sport.


It is really quite simple: your only competition at all times should be YOU.


Many people our age are inevitably doing many things to supplement their own resumes and applications when the time comes to apply. Your path and others' are going to be extremely different.


Therefore, it is crucial to understand that competing with others in the end will only put you behind. All that time spent thinking of others can be used to think about what motivates you and what you want to do to make yourself stronger and more ready for when it is time to produce your very best work.


I spent a lot of time wondering how teenagers do some of the very aspirational things we see on social media at such a young age. The answer is that they are pursuing their individual passions. Once you hone in on yours, you will find extracurriculars and activities that make you genuinely excited.


Ultimately, it depends on where you decide to put your energy. At some point, you will realize that many teenagers are doing many amazing things, which does not diminish the work that you have done. Focus on your strengths and make them who you are.


The competition stops when you stop giving it the power.


I really hope this advice helps. It will be something that I will continue to implement and see results from. Just remember: be confident in what you bring to the table!